DMC Atlanta President Adam Dorfman

DMC Atlanta President Adam Dorfman

Monday, March 26, 2012

Goal Setting – Powerful Written Goals In 7 Easy Steps





I first came across this article during my first month in business in 2003.  I opened DMC Atlanta in July of '03 with a start-up budget, a small team, and really big goals.  Having never been one to write down my goals (or much else, for that matter), it was the first article that truly helped me to understand the importance of quantifying and visualizing goals.  As Dave Ramsey says, "The difference between a goal and a dream is a plan." 

In going through old notes, I stumbled across the article and thought I would share.  Enjoy!

--AD



Goal Setting – Powerful Written Goals In 7 Easy Steps!by Gene Donohue



The car is packed and you’re ready to go, your first ever cross-country trip. From the White Mountains of New Hampshire to the rolling hills of San Francisco, you’re going to see it all.


You put the car in gear and off you go. First stop, the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.
A little while into the trip you need to check the map because you’ve reached an intersection you’re not familiar with. You panic for a moment because you realize you’ve forgotten your map.


But you say the heck with it because you know where you’re going. You take a right, change the radio station and keep on going. Unfortunately, you never reach your destination. Too many of us treat goal setting the same way. We dream about where we want to go, but we don’t have a map to get there. What is a map? In essence, the written word.


What is the difference between a dream and a goal? Once again, the written word.


But we need to do more then simply scribble down some ideas on a piece of paper. Our goals need to be complete and focused, much like a road map, and that is the purpose behind the rest of this article.


If you follow the 7 steps I’ve outlined below you will be well on your way to becoming an expert in building the road maps to your goals.


1. Make sure the goal you are working for is something you really want, not just something that sounds good.
I remember when I started taking baseball umpiring more seriously. I began to set my sites on the NCAA Division 1 level. Why? I new there was no way I could get onto the road to the major leagues, so the next best thing was the highest college level. Pretty cool, right. Wrong. Sure, when I was talking to people about my umpiring goals it sounded pretty good, and many people where quite impressed. Fortunately I began to see through my own charade.


I have been involved in youth sports for a long time. I’ve coached, I’ve been the President of leagues, I’ve been a treasurer and I’m currently a District Commissioner for Cal Ripken Baseball. Youth sports is where I belong, it is where my heart belongs, not on some college diamond where the only thing at stake is a high draft spot. When setting goals it is very important to remember that your goals must be consistent with your values.


2. A goal can not contradict any of your other goals. 

For example, you can’t buy a $750,000 house if your income goal is only $50,000 per year. This is called non-integrated thinking and will sabotage all of the hard work you put into your goals. Non-integrated thinking can also hamper your everyday thoughts as well. We should continually strive to eliminate contradictory ideas from our thinking.


3. Develop goals in the 6 areas of life: 

Family and Home
Financial and Career
Spiritual and Ethical
Physical and Health
Social and Cultural
Setting goals in each area of life will ensure a more balanced life as you begin to examine and change the fundamentals of everyday living. Setting goals in each area of live also helps in eliminating the non-integrated thinking we talked about in the 2nd step.


4. Write your goal in the positive instead of the negative.


Work for what you want, not for what you want to leave behind. Part of the reason why we write down and examine our goals is to create a set of instructions for our subconscious mind to carry out. Your subconscious mind is a very efficient tool, it can not determine right from wrong and it does not judge. It’s only function is to carry out its instructions. The more positive instructions you give it, the more positive results you will get.
Thinking positively in everyday life will also help in your growth as a human being. Don’t limit it to goal setting.


5. Write your goal out in complete detail.


Instead of writing “A new home,” write “A 4,000 square foot contemporary with 4 bedrooms and 3 baths and a view of the mountain on 20 acres of land. Once again we are giving the subconscious mind a detailed set of instructions to work on. The more information you give it, the more clearer the final outcome becomes. The more precise the outcome, the more efficient the subconscious mind can become.
Can you close your eyes and visualize the home I described above? Walk around the house. Stand on the porch off the master bedroom and see the fog lifting off the mountain. Look down at the garden full of tomatoes, green beans and cucumbers. And off to the right is the other garden full of a mums, carnations and roses. Can you see it? So can your subconscious mind.


6. By all means, make sure your goal is high enough.


Shoot for the moon, if you miss you’ll still be in the stars. Earlier I talked about my umpiring goals and how making it to the top level of college umpiring did not mix with my values. Some of you might be saying that I’m not setting my goals high enough. Not so. I still have very high goals for my umpiring career at the youth level. My ultimate goal is to be chosen to umpire a Babe Ruth World Series and to do so as a crew chief. If I never make it, everything I do to reach that goal will make me a better umpire and a better person. If I make it, but don’t go as a crew chief, then I am still among the top youth umpires in the nation. Shoot for the moon!


7. This is the most important, write down your goals.

Writing down your goals creates the roadmap to your success. Although just the act of writing them down can set the process in motion, it is also extremely important to review your goals frequently. Remember, the more focused you are on your goals the more likely you are to accomplish them.


Sometimes we realize we have to revise a goal as circumstances and other goals change, much like I did with my umpiring. If you need to change a goal do not consider it a failure, consider it a victory as you had the insight to realize something was different.


So your goals are written down.
Now what?


First of all, unless someone is critical to helping you achieve your goal(s), do not freely share your goals with others. The negative attitude from friends, family and neighbors can drag you down quickly. It’s very important that your self-talk (the thoughts in your head) are positive.


Reviewing your goals daily is a crucial part of your success and must become part of your routine. Each morning when you wake up read your list of goals that are written in the positive. Visualize the completed goal, see the new home, smell the leather seats in your new car, feel the cold hard cash in your hands. Then each night, right before you go to bed, repeat the process. This process will start both your subconscious and conscious mind on working towards the goal. This will also begin to replace any of the negative self-talk you may have and replace it with positive self-talk.


Every time you make a decision during the day, ask yourself this question, “Does it take me closer to, or further from my goal.” If the answer is “closer to,” then you’ve made the right decision. If the answer is “further from,” well, you know what to do. If you follow this process everyday you will be on your way to achieving unlimited success in every aspect of your life.


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Monday, March 19, 2012

Relationship Advice from Charlie Sheen . . .

Relationship Advice from Charlie Sheen.
Weight Loss Advice from Santa Claus.
Business Ethics Advice from Bernie Madoff.


  
As we can probably all agree, all of the above are on the top of my list of advice NONE of us should take.

In many of my recent interactions, I have noticed an abundance of young people taking advice from irrational, unreliable sources simply because they are convenient – and it scares the hell out of me.

We live in a world of instant gratification – look in one place, and be satisfied with the answer; ask the nearest person to you who you think has a clue, and take it as gospel; read something on the internet, and consider it fact-checked and accurate. Because of this, people are increasingly unable to think for themselves, draw their own conclusions, or make educated decisions.  Instead, they grab the closest answer and assume it’s the right one.

A recent study by the Local Consumer Review found that, of 2,862 respondents to a 4,500 person survey, 72% of people say that they trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations.

People - THIS JUST DOESN'T MAKE ANY SENSE!

As a species we are blessed (for the most part) with the ability to reason - to look at situations and determine, on our own, if something will help us or harm us - if something makes sense.

I'm not saying not to trust online reviews.  I use them all them time when seeking out restaurants, hotels, car rental companies - things that, in the greater scheme of things, are irrelevant to the direction my life is going or my long term happiness or success.

The place where I see a problem is when people make MAJOR, life-changing decisions based on the advice of complete strangers - when someone makes decisions about where to invest, where to send their child to school, or where to start a career without laying eyes on the institution, school, or company for themselves. 

I am in the process of determining where to buy a home based on where my family will receive the best education.  I will take reviews into account, but I'll be damned if I will decide ANYTHING without visiting all the schools, talking to parents, talking to teachers, and observing for myself.  I will never invest a dollar in a company that I have not had the opportunity to get to know personally. I would never decide to work at a company based on positive online reviews and would most certainly never decide NOT to work at a company based on a negative review.

I am posting this to, hopefully, encourage a little bit of free thought and challenge the readers to stray from the pack, don't jump off that cliff with the rest of the lemmings, swim upstream - use the intellect with which you were bestowed.  The internet is the last truly free form of expression, and there is neither accountability for one's negative words or validation of one's positive words. The idea of making life-altering decisions based solely on online reviews is reckless at best and moronic at worst.  Make your own choices - I dare you.


Monday, March 12, 2012

The 6 Most Annoying Coworkers - Are You One?

I was browsing through some of my favorite online journals and stumbled upon this article from 2010, written by Doug White of the Robert Half Companies.  Its message is a good one, so I thought I would share!  Enjoy the article, and consider reading it while sitting next to a mirror.





The 6 Most Annoying Coworkers: Are You One?

by Doug White, Robert Half International


Nearly every workplace has them: the Naysayer, who dismisses team members' ideas; the Spotlight Stealer, who claims credit for a colleague's efforts; and other annoying coworkers who make collaboration difficult. Following are six professionals whose irritating behaviors and irksome attitudes prevent them from forming productive relationships at work -- and what you should to do avoid following in their footsteps:

1. The Naysayer. This office dweller delights in shooting down ideas. Even during "blue sky" brainstorming sessions, where all suggestions are to be contemplated with an open mind, the Naysayer immediately pooh-poohs any proposal that challenges the status quo.

The right approach: Because great solutions often rise from diverse opinions, withhold comment -- and judgment -- until the appropriate time. Moreover, be tactful and constructive when delivering criticism or alternative viewpoints.

2. The Spotlight Stealer. There is definitely an "I" in "team" according to this glory seeker, who tries to take full credit for collaborative efforts and impress higher-ups. This overly ambitious corporate climber never heard a good idea he wouldn't pass off as his own.

The right approach: Win over the boss and colleagues by being a team player. When receiving kudos, for instance, publicly thank everyone who helped you. "I couldn't have done it without ..." is a savvy phrase to remember.

3. The Buzzwordsmith. Whether speaking or writing, the Buzzwordsmith sacrifices clarity in favor of showcasing an expansive vocabulary of cliched business terms. This ineffective communicator loves to "utilize" -- never just "use" -- industry-specific jargon and obscure acronyms that muddle messages. Favorite buzzwords include "synergistic," "actionable," "monetize," and "paradigm shift."

The right approach: Be succinct. Focus on clarity and minimize misunderstandings by favoring direct, concrete statements. If you're unsure whether the person you are communicating with will understand your message, rephrase it, using "plain English."

4. The Inconsiderate Emailer. Addicted to the "reply all" function, this "cc" supporter clogs colleagues' already-overflowing inboxes with unnecessary messages. This person also marks less-than-critical emails as "high priority" and sends enormous attachments that crash unwitting recipients' computers.

The right approach: Break the habit of using email as your default mode of communication, as many conversations are better suited for quick phone calls or in-person discussions. The benefit? The less email you send, the less you're likely to receive.

5. The Interrupter. The Interrupter has little regard for others' peace, quiet or concentration. When this person is not entering your work area to request immediate help, the Interrupter is in meetings loudly tapping on a laptop, fielding calls on a cell phone, or initiating off-topic side conversations.

The right approach: Don't let competing demands and tight deadlines trump basic common courtesy. Simply put, mind your manners to build healthy relationships at work.

6. The Stick in the Mud. This person is all business all of the time. Disapproving of any attempt at levity, the constant killjoy doesn't have fun at work and doesn't think anyone else should either.

The right approach: Have a sense of humor and don't be afraid to laugh at yourself once in awhile. A good laugh can help you build rapport, boost morale, and deflate tension when working under stressful situations.

It's fairly easy to spot the qualities that make the above individuals irritating -- at least when the behaviors are displayed by others. It can be a challenge to recognize when you exhibit them yourself. You may not realize, for instance, that you always pepper your communications with industry- or company-specific jargon, even when speaking with new employees or outside contacts. Though you may not be a full-fledged Interrupter or Stick in the Mud, take care to avoid heading down their paths.

The best advice: Remember common courtesy and act toward others as you want them to act toward you.